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On My BookshelfJust Finished

I’m featuring another Bookish Find over at Oh, the Books!: Kelly Campbell’s Book Sculptures. Be sure to check out Kelly Campbell’s website if you want to see more of her work.

If you want to check out my collection of Bookish Finds so far, check out Bookish Finds tag on my blog or visit my Bookish Finds board on Pinterest.

library-heaven:

(by Melina Souza)

“It’s how you think and how you behave that shows who you are. You aren’t evil, Nathan. Nothing about you is evil. You will have a powerful Gift - we can all see that - but it’s how you use it that will show you to be good or bad.”

—   Half Bad by Sally Green
I was tagged by @xcrini awhile ago to do the #bookishemotions tag. The emotion chosen for me was fear.
I’m afraid to read Dracula. Not because it’s about a vampire, no, but because it’s a classic. I’m contemplating picking it up after my current read since it’ll be good for Horror October Fortnight and my book bingo card requires a classic, but I don’t know. >.<

youngadultatbooktopia:

If you only read the books that everyone else is reading, you can only think what everyone else is thinking.
– Haruki Murakami

(via booksarehereforyou)

On My Bookshelf: Aristotle an Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz
When choosing which five LGBT books I wanted to read for Cayce’s challenge this year, I knew I had to read this one because of all of the hype.
Unfortunately, I didn’t completely fall in love with it. I enjoyed the author’s ability to capture the moodiness of being a teen and the relationships portrayed in the book, but it didn’t make me want to fangirl like everyone else. (My full review is over at Oh, the Books!, if you want to check it out.)
If you’re looking for a LGBT book to read, or even just a coming of age novel that is beautifully written and full of feels, check this one out. Just because it didn’t necessarily blow me away doesn’t mean it won’t work for you!

On My Bookshelf: Aristotle an Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz

When choosing which five LGBT books I wanted to read for Cayce’s challenge this year, I knew I had to read this one because of all of the hype.

Unfortunately, I didn’t completely fall in love with it. I enjoyed the author’s ability to capture the moodiness of being a teen and the relationships portrayed in the book, but it didn’t make me want to fangirl like everyone else. (My full review is over at Oh, the Books!, if you want to check it out.)

If you’re looking for a LGBT book to read, or even just a coming of age novel that is beautifully written and full of feels, check this one out. Just because it didn’t necessarily blow me away doesn’t mean it won’t work for you!

wildstag:

untitled by SamAlive on Flickr.
f07zeiss:

I took this photo today at the library when I went there to read Baudelaire.

f07zeiss:

I took this photo today at the library when I went there to read Baudelaire.

(via booksarehereforyou)

“No one buys this baby toys or presents because everyone knows it isn’t anted. No on gives Mother presents or flowers or chocolates because they all know she didn’t want this baby. Nobody wants a baby like this. Mother only gets one card but it doesn’t say ‘Congratulations’.

It says, ‘Kill It.’”

—   Half Bad by Sally Green
bookmania:

“Bookopolis,” an illustration by Eric Drooker for the November, 2006 issue of The New Yorker Magazine.

bookmania:

“Bookopolis,” an illustration by Eric Drooker for the November, 2006 issue of The New Yorker Magazine.

(via bookshelfblogger)

bostonianresolution:

"I have always imagined that Paradise will be a kind of library."
Jorge Luis Borges

bostonianresolution:

"I have always imagined that Paradise will be a kind of library."
Jorge Luis Borges

(via book-escapism)

Oh, the Books! Book Review: Maggot Moon by Sally Gardner

When his best friend Hector is suddenly taken away, Standish Treadwell realises that it is up to him, his grandfather and a small band of rebels to confront and defeat the ever present oppressive forces of The Motherland. 

Friendship and trust inspire Standish to rise up against an oppressive regime and expose the truth about a planned moon landing in this original and spellbinding book.

Giving an author a second chance is sometimes a good thing. Head over to Oh, the Books! to find out why I enjoyed Maggot Moon.